Posting out of sheer principle is rarely fascinating.

www.richboromusic.com

That’s our website, so  you can find us on the web.  I think that’s how this stuff works. Now on with the program. 

Just wanted to warn you that this post will not be terribly informative or life changing. It will have some pictures in it, so it’s worth the next 3 minutes of your life.  We try not to go too long without adding some new things to this blog. But…the busier the shop gets, the worse our documentation skills get regarding this thing.  So, without further adieu, here’s what I scavenged from my phone this morning

Here’s our resident inspector Joe checking on the progress of a bass fingerboard being planed.  The fingerboard ramped up at the end, so we plane it flat with…a planer.  Man, just not inspired today. Get it together cupcake!  Alright. We had a couple of interesting upright repairs last week. This one had a new bridge, some relief carved into the fingerboard and a hump on the bass side planed out.  Nice sounding bass, played hard by its owner. He wanted a low action at the nut and up high for his runs up the G string, but needed more relief in the middle of the neck so he wouldn’t buzz.  Hopefully the work passed the approval for the aforementioned Joe.

You never want to see this.  Bad fall, sheered the neck right off. Usually this would call for a replacement neck. However, the budget for this job dictated otherwise. We ended up drilling for a reinforcement dowel. Glued and clamped. Fingers crossed. Didn’t hold. Even with the scariest glue we could find. So we ended up with a re-do. This time we still went with the dowel, but removed the fingerboard and used 4 deck screws to help hold it all together.  Fingerboard back on and a little finish touch-up and it looked good.    Sounded great too. I really don’t think the break impacted the performance of the bass, so everyone involved was really happy.

We also had some cool 70’s and 60’s Gibsons last week. Here’s an SG in for a refret…

And a little more.

Since the neck is bound, the frets have to be cut and shaped prior to being clamped in. This is a rough fitting in progress. You have to trim the tang at the end so a little bit of the fret hangs over. All of the nubs (affectionate term for the bit of binding that goes over the fret end) were worn away, so we just had to let the fret hang over the binding without having to worry about fitting them in the old nub’s cavity. That’s a little trickier. Alright, a lot trickier but can be done.

Those are some old Dimarzios and modified pickup rings from the previous owner.  We reassembled using the existing parts so it was playable. But this one’s going to be completely restored. The current owner is planning on getting those pickups out in favor of some P-90’s and custom rings to fit the elongated cavity. Refinishing to remove some varnish brush strokes (!?!!??) is also in order. Can’t wait to see it when he’s done with the project.  Glad to be a part of it.

Here we are in mid pickguard fabrication. That’s a fancy word for cutting plastic. Makes you feel better when you say fabrication.  We ordered a cool pickguard, but it was just a hair to small for our customer’s taste. After staring at it for a few  minutes, I suggested we use the last bit of a tortoise shell pickguard blank we had. The blue tape was for tracing. We cut it with a roto-zip and hand filed the bevel. The bit on our table router was a little to steep, better suited for a strat pickguard than a jazzbox. Hand beveled sounds waaay better anyway.

This one involves an old Gibson hollowbody with a floating pickup. The original installation put the pickup a little too close to the middle for its current owner. We wanted to make a pickguard that put the pickup to be closer to the neck, but didn’t have too much room otherwise the hi E would hit it . The neck angle wasn’t designed to accomodate electronics without routing. And we didn’t want to do that.

Here’s the before. And the next will be the after. Just to clarify.

Here’s a pic of a sound port we cut into my guitar. We’ve been experimenting with this idea, as have many others for the past 100 years or so. It’s not revolutionary, but man does it work. If  you cut it in the right spot, this added a tremendous amount of detail and low end to the tone. The difference is apparent only to the player. Doesn’t effect the sound to the listener one bit. Good or bad.  But to my ears, it made my old Ovangkol bodied Washburn sound like a nice Rosewood dread.  Not for everybody, but I’m glad we did it. If you have a guitar that sounds  a little thin for your taste and you’re not afraid of regretting a hole cut into the side of your instrument, this monitor soundhole idea might just work for you.

That wraps up today’s entry.  Maybe next week we’ll hire that documentary crew and do this for reals. I meant that ‘s’ on the end. That’s for street cred.

And don’t forget to check us out at http://www.richboromusic.com

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