Gettin’ rid of that dang buzz pt 2 and other early January shop tidbits and a too-long title

Be sure to check us out at http://www.richboromusic.com. Whew. Always forget that part.

A while back we discussed shielding your guitar’s cavity to avoid the dreaded ground hum that’ll make you nuts playing under fluorescent lights or worse yet, that neon Stroh’s sign at the bar  you played at last Tuesday night.  Well, we had 5 shielding jobs already this week, so that warrants rehashing it in my book

Once it was explained to me that the best way to shield a cavity was to use conductive shielding paint in the pickup cavities and copper foil in the control cavity.  Just make sure the paint overlaps a tab of the foil to make sure it’s all connected.  And this certainly does the trick. However,  after some trial and error we figured nothing beats good ‘ol copper tape all the way through and on the back of the pickguard. Doing it this way seems to kill all of the hum (you can crank up your amp and tap the bridge with no noticeable difference), and even quiet down the 60 cycle hum of single coils about 50%. That’s a rough measurement because I have no idea how to actually measure things like that. I, like most people, tend to through out numbers and hope nobody questions me. You’ll also notice that we solder the seams all the way around. That’s a little overkill, you can just put a connection between each piece like a tack weld, just where each new piece overlaps.

Here’s another cavity, this time the much debated “swimming pool route”. They call that because you have to add chlorine to your Strat every week during the summer to…forget it. That’s not even funny.  You’ll also hear this called the universal route, because you can install any pickguard you want on top with any pickup configuration without worrying about routing for singles, humbuckers or P-90’s.  Some say the missing wood robs sustain, some say the open cavity adds jangle. I don’t think it make s bit of difference as I’ve heard great guitars with similar qualities with both routes. You’ll notice that the tape isn’t very smooth on this one. That’s not just a lazy repair guy. The pickup cavity of this guitar had lots of bumps and from not being smoothed before it was finished. The control cavity smoothed out nicely.  Not a big deal, we’re just sensitive. This also segues into the rest of this project…

Here’s the before shot of the Strat we just saw. It’s about to get a new set of Fender Custom Shop Texas Specials, new 5-way, grounds and wiring cleaned up and re-done, Roland GK kit installed and a basic setup to re-radius the saddles, fix the intonation and set the string height.  The following pictures will tell the story. I’ll stop talking while you look

This installation has the pickup screwed into the top of the pickguard. You can also route a channel into the guard to have the GK pickup mounted underneath. That’s a nice clean look, but for this one we needed all the height we could get otherwise we would have had to grind the bottoms of each saddle height screw to achieve the right balance of saddle height ( we like the screws to not slice your hand when palm muting) and GK tolerance. It has to be a maximum of 1mm from the strings when the last fretted note is depressed on each string.

Moving on. Here’s a cool conversion of an American Standard Tele that got some vintage vibe. We added Klusons and a Bigsby kit making this the coolest tele ever. Well that’s very subjective, but for today, it’s the coolest tele ever. You’ll notice that the Klusons have a smaller post hole size and needed these cool adapter bushings to fill the larger holes left by the modern tuners.

See this…

You don’t want to see this.  We were calling a customer to discuss some fretwork when we noticed that his neck was shifting. Badly. Turns out all of the glue in his dovetail had given way and the whole thing was being held together by tongue of the fretboard and the contact of the dovetail. You have to resist the temptation to just squirt some glue in there. You’ll be seeing it move again very soon. So off it comes.

Don’t know if you can see, but there’s not much glue to scrape off.  Must have been a Friday afernoon at the guitar plant and the glue was almost empty.  The fretboard extension didn’t put up too much of a fight with the iron and spatula, but at least was amply adhered.  The neck angle was great , so it wasn’t a technical re-set. More of  a “re-glue”.  Usually at this point we’d be shaving some wood in strategic spots to correct the neck pitch. This neck sighted up perfectly with the saddle/bridge line.

This guitar also had cracked & shrunken binding reglued, frets leveled and crowned and this repair done. Perhaps the culprit that helped the neck loosen? We may never know. This is the same neck but my photography skills are not too good. The center stripe on the first picture appears darker than in the second.  Something about the lighting and my poor composition skills. Whatever. The ding’s fixed. Next.

Here’s a saddle from a guitar that came in with uneven string response when plugged in. The E and A were quiet even after the bottom of the saddle was checked for straightness. Even though the impressions from the strings weren’t really deep, they did effect the response of the pickup. The moral of this story is simple. Next time you change your strings just smooth out any burrs with sandpaper and you’ll avoid this becoming a problem. Just good guitar hygiene.

Yes, we really took a before and after shot of a saddle that we sanded. Sad, isn’t it. Just need to document every waking hour just in case we wake up too early and start a blog post.

Thanks for reading and thanks to all of those who’ve frequented Coyle’s Richboro Music this year. We forgot to do an official “Thanks for your Support/Happy New Year” email.  All joking aside, we really do appreciate all the great people who’ve come to be part of our daily life at the shop.

Happy New Year! (there I said it.)

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